FREE shipping - All orders +$37.99

Shore Buddies webblog

Wisdom Wednesday | Great Hammerhead Sharks

Instagram photo of a Great Hammerhead Shark. Hammerhead Shark photo by Jim Abernethy.
Great Hammerheads use their hammer-shaped heads to find and eat their prey, which can include crabs, squids, various fish and occasionally, other small sharks. Their hammer-shaped heads contain electrical receptors that help them find their food, even if their prey is  hidden in the sand. Unlike other species of Hammerheads, Great Hammerhead sharks hunt in solitary. 

Wisdom Wednesday | The Dwarf Zebra Lionfish

image of Dwarf Zebra Lionfish by instagram user Danny Lee

The Dwarf Zebra Lionfish is easy to distinguish from the other lionfish species because of the enlarged pectoral fins. The fins are full and fan shaped and the fin membranes extend almost all the way to the end of the rays. They are usually found on sandy areas of reef flats ranging from between 3 meters to 25 meters in Tanzania but can be found down to 80 meters. Dwarf Lionfish feed at night and prey on small fishes and crustaceans and pretty much anything that fits in their mouth. They are ambush predators and move into positions where small fishes are likely to congregate. They use their proportionally large mouths to create a vacuum and suck in and swallow the prey. Being smaller than other Lionfish they go after smaller prey. They will sometimes use their pectoral fins to herd prey into a position where they can trap them. Little is known about their reproduction.

Wisdom Wednesday | The Weedy Sea Dragon

image of a Weedy Sea Dragon by instagram user Danny Lee
A Weedy Seadragon looks just like it sounds.. A mini sea dragon that would blend in with corals and seaweed very well! To avoid mouthfulls of sand when feeding, this animal will feed on its side and suck up tiny mycids! Compared to the leafy sea dragon, weedies have less flamboyant projections and are usually reddish in color with yellow spots. Weedy sea dragons have very long, thin snouts, slender trunks covered in bony rings, and thin tails which, unlike their seahorse cousins, cannot be used for gripping.

Wisdom Wednesday | Terns

Image of a tern by Instagram user Peter Rae
Terns are a common seabird that frequently get mistaken for seagulls. These graceful birds are characterised by their silver-grey upperparts, white underparts, black cap and red bill, as well as long tails. Almost all terns migrate, and the Arctic tern migrates every year from the Arctic to the Antarctica –a 25,000 mile trip, one way! Common tern colonies usually number around 2,000 birds, but can be as large as 20,000. They are often shared with other tern species such as Arctic and roseate terns.

Wisdom Wednesday 08/19/20

Image of a giant clam by Instagram user Amy Mercer
Giant clams were first documented by an Italian explorer, as early as 1521. The largest known specimen of the giant clam, till date, was found in 1817, off the north-western coast of Sumatra. It was 4.49 ft. long, and its shells weighed 510 lbs. In 1956, another giant clam that was about 3.77 ft. long was found in Japan, with its shells weighing about 730 lbs. Because of its sessile nature, the moment the giant clam chooses a spot as its ‘home’, it fastens itself to the same, and then cannot go elsewhere for the rest of its life. 

Wisdom Wednesday 08/12/20

Image of Long Nosed Fur Seals by Instagram user @submerged_images
Fur Seals are named for their two-layered fur: an outer layer, and an undercoat that helps their skin stay dry underwater. Now protected, this species was hunted almost to extinction for the fur trade in earlier centuries. Fur seal has very thick, reddish brown, brownish gray or black fur. Females of some species have light-colored fur on the front side of the body. Fur seal has small ears, long, muscular front flippers and stocky body. Seals move swiftly and gracefully through the water using their powerful fore flipper and can be quite agile on land, walking on all four of their flippers. 

Wisdom Wednesday 5/13/20

Photo of a Seal from The Marine Mammal Center on instagram @themarinemammalcenter

“The Marine Mammal Center has been conducting research on marine mammal diseases since 1975. Because animals in our care offer a unique opportunity to perform blood and tissue analyses, The Marine Mammal Center has become a leading resource for researchers and scientists to turn to for answers about marine mammal care, medicine and health data. Every marine mammal patient we treat provides a never-before-seen glimpse into human medical conditions.” 

Shore Buddies supports rescued wildlife during the COVID-19 shutdown. Many animal care facilities are struggling with providing continuous care for their patients. Shore Buddies decided to partner with 4x organizations and DONATE 100% of PROFITS for the treatment of those animals in these troubling times. One of those organizations is The Marine Mammal Center! Every purchase of Sammy the Seal goes to helping these seals!

 

Wisdom Wednesday 5/06/20

Tasmanian Blenny photo from instagram user Danny Lee @submerged_images
Tasmanian Blenny fish are odd looking fish that bring joy to the reefs with a large head, a blunt snout with a steep profile, and a large frilled tentacle over each eye. Tasmanian Blennies are pale brownish to dark brown or bluish-grey with a pattern of irregular bars and blotches on the sides, and two dark bars radiating from below the eye.

Wisdom Wednesday 11/27/19

African Mouth Brooding Cichlid photo by Instagram @mpophotography
The females taking care of their fry are called maternal mouthbrooders because  the female immediately picks up the fertilized eggs and holds them in her mouth for about three weeks while the little ones hatch and grow a bit. During this time, the female will not eat in order to give the next generation a head start in life.

Wisdom Wednesday 11/20/19

Barrier Reef photo from Instagram @javifigs
Barrier reefs help to protect lagoons and other shallow waters. It is essentially a coral reef running parallel to the shore but separated from it by a channel of deep water. A barrier reef is usually pierced by several channels that give access to the lagoon and the island or continent beyond it.

Wisdom Wednesday 11/13/19

Rock-dwelling cichlid picture from Instagram @mpophotography
Not much is known about this cichlid due to it being endemic to Lake Malawi, meaning they are only found in this particular lake. There are a total of 12 genera of very active and aggressive personalities in this group. Regardless of the drastically different personalities in a group, a single group won't swim much more than about 3 feet away from the particular rock island they have designated as their home.

Shore Buddies Ocean Hero of the Week: Emily Penn

Emily Penn of eXXpedition

Shore Buddies Ocean Hero of the Week: Emily Penn

I’m Stephen Seagull, and I’m ready to bring you a whaley good Ocean Hero this week! This amazing person has been involved in reducing plastic pollution for over a decade! That’s longer than I can fly by a long shot! Since the beginning, she has founded her own organization and touched so many people along the way!