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Shore Buddies webblog

Wisdom Wednesday 6/3/20

Tiger Shark photo from Instagram user Jason Washington
And maybe the most bizarre fact of all.. One individual tiger shark found itself in the middle of a murder mystery! In April 1935, Coogee Aquarium in Sydney, Australia was looking for a big fish to occupy its newly-built pool. On a fishing trip off Coogee beach, Bert Hobson snared a 13-foot tiger shark for the aquarium. The shark was a big hit at the aquarium, but it didn’t last very long. Seven days after its arrival, it got sick and vomited up a bird, a rat, some nasty-looking brown goo—and a human arm, which had a rope tied around its wrist and a forearm tattoo of two boxers. An amateur boxer named James Smith had recently gone missing, and he had the exact same tattoo on one arm.

Wisdom Wednesday 5/13/20

Photo of a Seal from The Marine Mammal Center on instagram @themarinemammalcenter

“The Marine Mammal Center has been conducting research on marine mammal diseases since 1975. Because animals in our care offer a unique opportunity to perform blood and tissue analyses, The Marine Mammal Center has become a leading resource for researchers and scientists to turn to for answers about marine mammal care, medicine and health data. Every marine mammal patient we treat provides a never-before-seen glimpse into human medical conditions.” 

Shore Buddies supports rescued wildlife during the COVID-19 shutdown. Many animal care facilities are struggling with providing continuous care for their patients. Shore Buddies decided to partner with 4x organizations and DONATE 100% of PROFITS for the treatment of those animals in these troubling times. One of those organizations is The Marine Mammal Center! Every purchase of Sammy the Seal goes to helping these seals!

 

Wisdom Wednesday 5/06/20

Tasmanian Blenny photo from instagram user Danny Lee @submerged_images
Tasmanian Blenny fish are odd looking fish that bring joy to the reefs with a large head, a blunt snout with a steep profile, and a large frilled tentacle over each eye. Tasmanian Blennies are pale brownish to dark brown or bluish-grey with a pattern of irregular bars and blotches on the sides, and two dark bars radiating from below the eye.

Wisdom Wednesday 3/18/20

Instagram photo box flying fish by Michael Patrick O'Neil
Flying Fish are unique in that they can reach the height of 4 feet in the air, and glide a distance of 655 feet before returning back to the water. They are usually 7 to 12 inches long with the upper side of the body being bluish-grey and their belly grayish-silver. The flying fish has forked tail with the lower piece of the tail longer than upper piece. Pectoral fins of flying fish can be spread into wing-like shape. Flying fish are shaped like a torpedo. Their fins are closed when they swim to ensure faster movement through the water. Before it emerges above the water, flying fish accelerate toward the surface of the water with a speed of 37 miles per hour.

Wisdom Wednesday 2/26/2020

Longnose Gar photo by Michael Patrick O'Neil on Instagram
Swimming with dinosaurs! Longnose Gar (and other species of this family) are ancient fish perfected suited to thrive in conditions that would easily kill most fish. They can gulp air when necessary, allowing them to survive in low oxygen and higher salinity water than most fish.

Wisdom Wednesday 2/19/2020

Shipwreck artificial reef photo by John Garza on Instagram
In some instances, however, the negative ecological impacts of artificial reefs may outweigh potential economic gains. For example, development of artificial reefs may cause an increase in overall visitation to an area, meaning more visitors to both artificial and natural reefs.

Rallying against single use plastic

Shore Buddies - Malte Niebelschuetz Speech Capitol Sacramento.png

Shore Buddies stands up for Ocean Animals and against plastic

Shore Buddies supports and rallies in favor of companion bills SB54 & AB1080 in Sacramento, California. These two ambitious companion bills will reduce the amount of product waste by decreasing single-use packaging and plastic products sold in California. This would be a huge step towards a circular economy.

Wisdom Wednesday 8/28/2019

Coral reef Instagram photo
Known as “rainforests of the sea,” coral reefs cover less than 1% of the ocean but are home to almost 25% of all known marine species!

Wisdom Wednesday 8/21/2019

seastar or starfish
They have a very interesting way of eating...When Starfish capture prey, they have tiny suction cups to grab ahold of their food. Then their stomach exits their mouth to digest the food, and reenters the body when they’re done eating.

Wisdom Wednesday 8/14/2019

Wisdom Wednesday shark photo for Shore Buddies
Aging a shark is similar to aging a tree - scientists age sharks by counting the rings on their vertebrae.

Wisdom Wednesday 8/07/2019

Stephen Seagull of Shore Buddies
Seagulls are very intelligent birds. They use bread crumbs to attract fish and produce rain-like sound with their feet to attract earthworms hidden under the ground

Ocean Hero of the Week: Justin Sather

Justin Sather of For the Love of Frogs with Shore Buddies Stephen Seagull

Ocean Hero of the Week: Justin Sather

Justin started selling toy frogs around the neighborhood. He recognized that incorporating science with art inspired others to listen. Through frog art and his own frog-themed shoes, his message quickly expanded from one neighbor to the next and increased through social media partnerships. As he raised awareness, he also raised thousands of dollars.

His first $2,000 was donated to Save the Frogs! non-profit. Justin’s passion for the wetlands grew and he set up local cleanups and donated hundreds of gloves. On his 8th birthday, he invited his friends to the Ballona Wetlands to pick invasive weeds and discuss the harms of plastic pollution.