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Wisdom Wednesday 4/8/20

Photo of a blue ringed octopus by William Soo on Instagram
This venom is more toxic than of any land animal. It is said that the venom of this octopus could kill 26 adults in just a few minutes. There is no antivenom for treatment.

Wisdom Wednesday 3/4/20

Instagram Photo of Sea Foam by Steve Peletz
Algal blooms are one common source of thick sea foams. When large blooms of algae decay offshore, great amounts of decaying algal matter often wash ashore. Foam forms as this organic matter is churned up by the surf. Most sea foam is not harmful to humans and is often an indication of a productive ocean ecosystem. But when large harmful algal blooms decay near shore, there are potential for impacts to human health and the environment.

Wisdom Wednesday 1/29/2020

Penguin photo by Justin Hofman on Instagram
Fossils place the earliest penguin relative at some 60 million years ago, meaning an ancestor of the birds we see today survived the mass extinction of the dinosaurs. Because they aren't used to danger from animals on solid ground, wild penguins exhibit no particular fear of human tourists.

Wisdom Wednesday 12/18/19

Sea Turtle image by @zackvibes on Instagram

This week we’re switching up our Wisdom Wednesday blog to be more of an update about a popular topic in ocean pollution: Sea Turtles. Sea turtles are affected by plastic during every stage of their life. They crawl through plastic on the way to the ocean as hatchlings, swim through it while migrating, confuse it for jellyfish (one of their favorite foods), and then crawl back through it as adults. Researchers estimate that over half of all sea turtles in the world have ingested plastic. And a single piece of plastic has a 20% chance of killing them. If sea turtles disappear from the ocean, it wouldn’t only be a huge loss for future human generations but it would also threaten the longevity of other marine life. Scientists believe that sea turtle species are essential to the health of marine ecosystems.



Wisdom Wednesday 9/25/2019

Tiger Tail Sea Cucumber photo from Instagram
Tiger Tail Sea Cucumbers are the largest sea cucumber in the Western Atlantic. They feed on algae and detritus. Juveniles often mimic sea slugs by crawling around on the bottom slowly filtering sand through their tentacles to gather food.

Wisdom Wednesday 9/18/2019

Globe Fish image from Instagram
When pufferfish are threatened, they can take in so much air inside their stomachs that they bloat and turn into large, perfect balls up to three times larger!

Ocean Hero of the Week: Justin Sather

Justin Sather of For the Love of Frogs with Shore Buddies Stephen Seagull

Ocean Hero of the Week: Justin Sather

Justin started selling toy frogs around the neighborhood. He recognized that incorporating science with art inspired others to listen. Through frog art and his own frog-themed shoes, his message quickly expanded from one neighbor to the next and increased through social media partnerships. As he raised awareness, he also raised thousands of dollars.

His first $2,000 was donated to Save the Frogs! non-profit. Justin’s passion for the wetlands grew and he set up local cleanups and donated hundreds of gloves. On his 8th birthday, he invited his friends to the Ballona Wetlands to pick invasive weeds and discuss the harms of plastic pollution.

Shore Buddies Ocean Hero of the Week: Emily Penn

Emily Penn of eXXpedition

Shore Buddies Ocean Hero of the Week: Emily Penn

I’m Stephen Seagull, and I’m ready to bring you a whaley good Ocean Hero this week! This amazing person has been involved in reducing plastic pollution for over a decade! That’s longer than I can fly by a long shot! Since the beginning, she has founded her own organization and touched so many people along the way!

The biggest Ocean Clean Up ever launched

Emma the Whale swimming in Trash.png

The biggest Ocean Clean Up ever launched

Emma here! Today I am excited to tell you about the launch of "The Ocean Cleanup". You might have read my previous article about this initiative and how it could help to resolve the issue of the great pacific garbage patch.