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Shore Buddies webblog

Wisdom Wednesday | Leopard Sharks

Image of a Leopard Shark from Amy Mercer
Living up to about 30 years, leopard sharks can be found in shallow muddy waters, particularly Northern California. Often times they are preyed upon by larger sharks, like the Great White, but they themselves eat relatively small animals like worms, crabs, octopus, and fish.  Branching off from a species of houndshark in the Triakidae family, adult leopard sharks can grow up to 6 feet long, but typically average at about 5 feet.

Weekly Newsletter | San Diego Rotary Club

The Shore Buddies founder is doing important and awesome things! On July 15, 2021, Malte was invited to speak at the San Diego Rotary Club. This club is just a branch that belongs to a much larger service organization called Rotary International.

Wisdom Wednesday | Garden Eel

Image of a Garden Eel in the ocean. Photo by @joeshenouda on Instagram.
Garden Eels live in colonies of up to 700 individuals and burrow in the sand of the ocean floor, using mucus from their bodies to prevent the sand around them from collapsing. These eels tend to stay in their individual burrows, rarely leaving to catch their prey, zooplankton, that floats by them.

Wisdom Wednesday | Hawaiian Monk Seal

Image of a Hawaiian Monk Seal pup on a beach in Hawaii. Photo by @creationscape on Instagram.
Hawaiian Monk Seals got their name because the folds on their skin look similar a monk’s cowl. Additionally, like a monk, these seals tend to live in solitary. When these seals are born, they are black in color. They turn to shades of gray and brown as they mature.

Wisdom Wednesday | Damselfish

Image of a Damselfish by Manuela Kirschner
Unlike many species of reef fishes that broadcast their eggs into the water above the reef, damselfishes stick their eggs to the reef surface and guard them until they hatch. Males try to keep the highest quality gardens in order to have a greater chance at success in courting a female. Together, they aggressively defend the eggs from wrasses and other foraging predators that would love an easy meal of yolky fish eggs.

Wisdom Wednesday | How old are Sea Turtles?

Photo of a sea turtle by Jason  Washington
The actual documentation of the age of any species of sea turtle is difficult. What we do know is that sea turtles live a long time based on their species. Of the seven species of sea turtles on the globe, the hawksbill has the shortest lifespan at 30 to 50 years, and the green turtle has the longest at 80 years or more. The largest and smallest sea turtles–the leatherback and the kemp's ridley, respectively–both have an average lifespan of 45 to 50 years.  The oldest sea turtle documented survived to be 150 years young! Most marine turtles take decades to mature—between 20 and 30 years—and remain actively reproductive for another 10 years.

Wisdom Wednesday | What's in a Whale's Mouth

image of a humpback whale by Derek Troxell
Whales have HUGE mouths, extending to their belly buttons! This allows them to swallow a volume of water larger than themselves. Their throat stretches down to their navel. Tongue is the size of an elephant. You and 400 of your friends could fit in its mouth! Whales can be divided into two groups: the toothed whale and baleen whale.

2,000 School-aged Children Received An Early, Ocean-Friendly Holiday Surprise

2,000 School-aged Children Received An Early, Ocean-Friendly Holiday Surprise

2,000 School-aged Children Received An Early, Ocean-Friendly Holiday Surprise from Shore Buddies

Shore Buddies and San Diego Unified School District Lunch giving

Elementary children enrolled in the San Diego Unified School District’s food distribution program will receive an early Christmas gift today courtesy of toy company, Shore Buddies and San Diego Coastkeeper, a non-profit organization committed to protecting and restoring San Diego’s rivers, streams and coastline and wildlife that depend on clean water. This donation is also part of a greater social initiative for Shore Buddies, whose mission is to save marine life by actively keeping plastic out of the ocean as well as educate children about the dangers of single use plastic for the environment.