FREE shipping - All orders +$44.95

Shore Buddies webblog

Wisdom Wednesday | Picasso Triggerfish

Wisdom Wednesday | Picasso Triggerfish
“While the fish in this photo appears to be sitting there allowing me to take his photo it was quite the contrary. He came up at me from the sandy bottom with such intent and speed that I couldn't believe I managed to get him in the frame, let alone having him and is grumpy face in focus!” Picasso Triggerfish vocalizes using a "grunting" sound.

Wisdom Wednesday | Red Coney

Wisdom Wednesday | Red Coney
The United States Navy named one of it's submarines after this majestic game fish. It was launched out of Groton, Connecticut on October 27th 1941, then decommissioned and sold for scrapping on August 11th 1970.

Wisdom Wednesday | Penguins

Wisdom Wednesday | Penguins
We all know that penguins can’t fly, but did you know that they have adapted their wings to be better at swimming in the water?  Their black and white coloring helps them to camouflage while they are darting through the seas.  From below their white bellies appear to be nothing else than the sun reflecting on the water, and from above their black feathers blend in with the ocean.

Wisdom Wednesday | Seagulls

Wisdom Wednesday | Seagulls
Aside from their eating habits, seagulls possess other unique characteristics different from many animals, including the ability to drink both fresh water and saltwater.  They even have a superpower-like ability to hover over bridges and absorb energy from the heat of paved roadways! 

Wisdom Wednesday | Crabs

Kelp crab in seaweed
With tastebuds on their feet, crabs eat both meat and plants making them what we call omnivores. The average life of a crab may be short, lasting up to 3 to 4 years, but don’t worry because there are over 4,500 species of them! 

Wisdom Wednesday | Seahorses

Image of two seahorses swimming near coral in Hawaii. Image by @creationscape on Instagram.
 Seahorses use camouflage to avoid predators and sneakily attack their prey, which includes a variety of small crustaceans. These animals have eyes that move independently from one another which also helps them to track and ambush prey. They do not have teeth or stomachs, so they must eat almost constantly to survive.

Wisdom Wednesday | Garden Eel

Image of a Garden Eel in the ocean. Photo by @joeshenouda on Instagram.
Garden Eels live in colonies of up to 700 individuals and burrow in the sand of the ocean floor, using mucus from their bodies to prevent the sand around them from collapsing. These eels tend to stay in their individual burrows, rarely leaving to catch their prey, zooplankton, that floats by them.

Wisdom Wednesday | Hawaiian Monk Seal

Image of a Hawaiian Monk Seal pup on a beach in Hawaii. Photo by @creationscape on Instagram.
Hawaiian Monk Seals got their name because the folds on their skin look similar a monk’s cowl. Additionally, like a monk, these seals tend to live in solitary. When these seals are born, they are black in color. They turn to shades of gray and brown as they mature.

Wisdom Wednesday | Starfish

Image of a starfish in the ocean by @joeshenouda on Instagram.
Starfish can live for up to 35 years in the wild. They vary in size from one centimeter to 65 centimeters depending on the species. There are 1,600 species of starfish throughout oceans around the world and different species live in habitats including tidal pools, rocky shores, sea grass, kelp beds, and coral reefs.

Wisdom Wednesday | Crown Jellyfish

Image of a crown jellyfish floating at the surface of the ocean. Photo by @creationscape on Instagram.
These jellyfish have 8 arms that surround their mouths and help them find food. Their diet consists of zooplankton, algae, shrimp, and invertebrate eggs. Although this species of jellyfish is the most venomous, they are not harmful to humans. 

Wisdom Wednesday | Whale Sharks

Photo of a whale shark swimming through the ocean. Photo by @inkacresswell on Instagram.
Whale sharks are the world’s largest fish, reaching up to 40 feet and weighing an average of 20,000 pounds. These gentle giants can neither bite nor chew and are filter feeders. Their mouths contain hundreds of rows of tiny teeth and can open up to 4 feet wide. 

Wisdom Wednesday | Leatherback Sea Turtles

The largest sea turtle, the Leatherback, can reach up to 2,200 pounds. Unlike other species of sea turtles, Leatherback turtles have a rubbery shell composed of cartilage-like tissues rather than a hard, bony shell. Leatherback turtles also live in waters of more of the world than any other sea turtle.