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Shore Buddies webblog

Wisdom Wednesday | Leopard Sharks

Image of a Leopard Shark from Amy Mercer
Living up to about 30 years, leopard sharks can be found in shallow muddy waters, particularly Northern California. Often times they are preyed upon by larger sharks, like the Great White, but they themselves eat relatively small animals like worms, crabs, octopus, and fish.  Branching off from a species of houndshark in the Triakidae family, adult leopard sharks can grow up to 6 feet long, but typically average at about 5 feet.

Wisdom Wednesday | Coral Reefs

Wisdom Wednesday | Coral Reefs
Did you know some coral reefs are THOUSANDS of years old?! Although they only take up 1% of the ocean floor, our coral reefs provide 25% of marine life a place to live.

Wisdom Wednesday | Whale Sharks

Photo of a whale shark swimming through the ocean. Photo by @inkacresswell on Instagram.
Whale sharks are the world’s largest fish, reaching up to 40 feet and weighing an average of 20,000 pounds. These gentle giants can neither bite nor chew and are filter feeders. Their mouths contain hundreds of rows of tiny teeth and can open up to 4 feet wide. 

Wisdom Wednesday | Caribbean Reef Shark

Caribbean Reef Shark swimming through the ocean. Photo by Steve Peletz.
Caribbean Reef Sharks are the first and only species of shark to rest or “sleep” on the ocean floors inside reef caves. Because of this, they have been given the nickname “sleeping sharks”.

Wisdom Wednesday | Great Hammerhead Sharks

Instagram photo of a Great Hammerhead Shark. Hammerhead Shark photo by Jim Abernethy.
Great Hammerheads use their hammer-shaped heads to find and eat their prey, which can include crabs, squids, various fish and occasionally, other small sharks. Their hammer-shaped heads contain electrical receptors that help them find their food, even if their prey is  hidden in the sand. Unlike other species of Hammerheads, Great Hammerhead sharks hunt in solitary. 

Wisdom Wednesday | Whale Sharks

Image of Whale Shark by Instagram user Amy Mercer
Whale sharks are filter feeders that eat plankton through their gills for much of their nourishment. They also eat squid, krill, and small fish. A whale shark can process more than 6,000 liters of water an hour through its gills. Whale sharks are in no way related to whales. Although they are sharks, they are very docile. A whale shark’s mouth is at the very front of its head—as opposed to the underside of the head like most sharks.

Wisdom Wednesday 3/11/20

Instagram photo of a seal by Justin Hofman
Seals spend much of their life in water! Their thick fur and blubber offer protection against freezing temperatures. Seals have more blood in their body than other animals. Since blood cells keep the oxygen, seal can dive longer than other animals. Seal can hold its breath for 2 hours which is a record in the animal world. They can dive up to 1000-1300 feet deep when they are searching for food.

Wisdom Wednesday 8/14/2019

Wisdom Wednesday shark photo for Shore Buddies
Aging a shark is similar to aging a tree - scientists age sharks by counting the rings on their vertebrae.

Wisdom Wednesday-5/23/18

Wisdom Wednesday-5/23/18
Did you know sharks have incredible hearing? As if speed and strength weren’t enough...