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Shore Buddies webblog

Wisdom Wednesday | Batfish

Wisdom Wednesday | Batfish
Did you know that batfish are actually not strong swimmers?  Even with their long anal and dorsal fins, scientists know batfish to be a “sleeper species” because they play a vital role in the upkeep of coral reefs but can only do so under certain conditions.

Wisdom Wednesday | Coral Reefs

Wisdom Wednesday | Coral Reefs
Did you know some coral reefs are THOUSANDS of years old?! Although they only take up 1% of the ocean floor, our coral reefs provide 25% of marine life a place to live.

Wisdom Wednesday | Seahorses

Image of two seahorses swimming near coral in Hawaii. Image by @creationscape on Instagram.
 Seahorses use camouflage to avoid predators and sneakily attack their prey, which includes a variety of small crustaceans. These animals have eyes that move independently from one another which also helps them to track and ambush prey. They do not have teeth or stomachs, so they must eat almost constantly to survive.

Wisdom Wednesday | Garden Eel

Image of a Garden Eel in the ocean. Photo by @joeshenouda on Instagram.
Garden Eels live in colonies of up to 700 individuals and burrow in the sand of the ocean floor, using mucus from their bodies to prevent the sand around them from collapsing. These eels tend to stay in their individual burrows, rarely leaving to catch their prey, zooplankton, that floats by them.

Wisdom Wednesday | Crown Jellyfish

Image of a crown jellyfish floating at the surface of the ocean. Photo by @creationscape on Instagram.
These jellyfish have 8 arms that surround their mouths and help them find food. Their diet consists of zooplankton, algae, shrimp, and invertebrate eggs. Although this species of jellyfish is the most venomous, they are not harmful to humans. 

Wisdom Wednesday | Leatherback Sea Turtles

The largest sea turtle, the Leatherback, can reach up to 2,200 pounds. Unlike other species of sea turtles, Leatherback turtles have a rubbery shell composed of cartilage-like tissues rather than a hard, bony shell. Leatherback turtles also live in waters of more of the world than any other sea turtle.

Wisdom Wednesday | Tripod Fish

Tripod fish got their names because when they are still, they look like a tripod. They have three long structures that allow them to walk on the ocean floor. Their fins can reach up to 3.3 feet in length, although their bodies are only 12 to 14 inches long. They use their pectoral fins to detect what is around them in the water and to find prey because their eyes have limited abilities. 

Wisdom Wednesday | Butterfly Fish

Image of a butterfly fish swimming by the coral reef. Photo by @manuela.kirschner on Instagram.
Butterfly fish can reach up to 8 inches in length, but typically range from around 3 to 6 inches. These fish got their name because of their coloring. They can be black, orange, yellow, silver, red, and white and have different patterns on their bodies. Many species of Butterfly fish have black stripes and spots that serve to confuse and distract their predators. Butterfly fish have elongated noses that help them reach in cracks and crevices of rocks to eat.

Wisdom Wednesday | Octopuses

Image of an octopus swimming in the ocean. Photo by @creationscape on Instagram
They have three hearts, two of which help move their blood beyond their gills. Their third heart’s function is to circulate blood to their organs. The third heart does not beat while an octopus swims, which is part of why swimming exhausts them so much and they prefer to crawl. Octopuses also have blue, copper-based blood, unlike a human’s iron-based blood. This difference in blood type helps octopuses survive in colder waters that have lower amounts of oxygen.

Wisdom Wednesday | Bluestripe Snapper

Image of a school of bluestripe snappers swimming in the sea. Photo by @manuela.kirschner on Instagram.
The Bluestripe snapper lives in tropical waters around the world. They live in coral reefs, often near caves, and in shallow lagoons. In the 1950s, the Bluestripe snapper was introduced to the waters of Hawaii as a potential food source, but their low economic value prevented them from being a continued food source. 

Wisdom Wednesday | Caribbean Reef Shark

Caribbean Reef Shark swimming through the ocean. Photo by Steve Peletz.
Caribbean Reef Sharks are the first and only species of shark to rest or “sleep” on the ocean floors inside reef caves. Because of this, they have been given the nickname “sleeping sharks”.

Wisdom Wednesday | Clownfish

Image of a clownfish peeking through sea anemone. Photo by @divercaptain on Instagram.
Did you know that all Clownfish are born male? Clownfish have a strict hierarchy, the most aggressive female is at the top. Because all Clownfish are born male, when the top female dies, the most dominant male will turn itself into a female and take its place at the top of the hierarchy.