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Wisdom Wednesday | Sea Turtle Hatchlings

Photo of a sea turtle hatchling by Instagram user Cassie Jensen
The hatchlings do not have sex chromosomes so their gender is determined by the temperature within the nest. The temperature varies slightly among species, ranging between roughly 83-85 degrees Fahrenheit (28-29 degrees Celsius), at which embryos within a nest develop into a mix of males and females. Temperatures above this range produce females and colder temperatures produce males. It's estimated that only 1 in 1,000 hatchlings will survive to adulthood. Once near the surface, they will often remain there until the temperature of the sand cools, usually indicating nighttime, when they are less likely to be eaten by predators or overheat. Once out of the nest, hatchlings face many predators including ghost crabs, birds, raccoons, dogs, and fish.

Wisdom Wednesday 12/18/19

Sea Turtle image by @zackvibes on Instagram

This week we’re switching up our Wisdom Wednesday blog to be more of an update about a popular topic in ocean pollution: Sea Turtles. Sea turtles are affected by plastic during every stage of their life. They crawl through plastic on the way to the ocean as hatchlings, swim through it while migrating, confuse it for jellyfish (one of their favorite foods), and then crawl back through it as adults. Researchers estimate that over half of all sea turtles in the world have ingested plastic. And a single piece of plastic has a 20% chance of killing them. If sea turtles disappear from the ocean, it wouldn’t only be a huge loss for future human generations but it would also threaten the longevity of other marine life. Scientists believe that sea turtle species are essential to the health of marine ecosystems.



Wisdom Wednesday 9/11/2019

Golden Cuttlefish image from Instagram
Despite their name, cuttlefish are not fish but molluscs, and there are over 120 species of cuttlefish. Cuttlefish have eight arms and two tentacles. Both the tentacles and arms have suckers.

Shore Buddies Ocean Hero of the Week: Marc Ward

Marc Ward helping keep oceans clean with Shore Buddies Shelly the Sea Turtle

Shore Buddies Ocean Hero of the Week: Marc Ward

Stephen Seagull Interview partner.pngHi, Stephen here. Marc Ward is one of the greatest protectors of my dear friend, Shelly the Sea Turtle. Through his adventures, he developed quite a passion for marine life in realizing just how important they are to our oceans. His love for turtles drove him to help create Sea Turtles Forever, a program that dedicated everything they had to protecting sea turtles from all the problems they can face. 

Wisdom Wednesday 02/27/2019

Shore Buddies Wisdom Wednesday - Sea Turtles swimming peacefully in ocean.jpg

Wisdom Wednesday

Did you know you can identify the sex of a turtle by the sounds they make? The temperature when incubated determines the sex of the embryo. Cooler temperatures produce males whereas warmer temperatures produce females. You can also...

Wisdom Wednesday 02/06/2019

Shore Buddies Wisdom Wednesday Turtle facts.jpg

Wisdom Wednesday

A turtle’s shell has 60 different bones all connected together. The bony part is covered with plates made from the skin, which offer more strength and protection to the shell. Most turtles...

Wisdom Wednesday 01/30/2019

Shore Buddies Sea Turtle footprints in sand.jpg

Wisdom Wednesday

Turtles live in any climate that’s warm enough for them to complete a whole breeding cycle. Because of this, turtles live on every continent except Antarctica. North America has such a wide variety of turtle species, but Europe only has two species of turtles and...

After 100years! A baby turtle on Galapagos for the first time

Shelly the Sea Turtle - After 100 years they are back.png

After 100years! A baby turtle on Galapagos for the first time

Hey Guys, Shelly here!

I'm so excited to bring some great news for a change. Amidst all the horrible news about the health of our oceans and all the plastic in there....

Wisdom Wednesday 01/23/2019

Shore Buddies Sea Turtle swimming.png

Wisdom Wednesday

Turtles are on of the oldest and most primitive groups of reptiles, and have been on Earth for more than 200 million years, evolving even before mammals, birds, crocodiles, snakes, and lizards!